Torrendiella eucalypti

Chlorovibrissea melanochlora Cordierites frondosa Cudoniella clavus Favolaschia calocera Heterotextus miltinus Leotia lubrica Mucronella pendula Mutinus boninensis Nidula emodensis Plectania campylospora Scutellinia scutellata Torrendiella clelandii Torrendiella eucalypti
distribution map
Source: ALA

Badger Creek, June 2015

Bunyip State Park, Jun 2014

Otways, Apr 2014
more
Common Namenone
FamilySclerotiniaceae
Genus/SpeciesTorrendiella eucalypti (Berk.) Spooner 1987
SynonymHymenotorrendiella eucalypti
Abundance &
Distribution
Moderately common in Tasmania and southern Victoria. Probably very common in south-eastern Australia wherever its host grows but only apparent after a wet period and easily overlooked. I now specifically search for Torrendiella and find them on most occasions in the right conditions.
Habitat &
Substrate
Described originally from the leaves of the Blackwood Wattle Acacia melanoxylon, mistakenly thought a Eucalyptus leaf (I find it quite embarrassing for someone to be knowledgeable enough to describe a new species but not know the difference between a Eucalyptus leaf and those from Acacia).
DescriptionThese are tiny cup fungi, typically half to one millimetre across with a stalk similarly long. It is cream-colored turning yellower with age and sparsely fringed with fine, dark hairs (setae) that can have fallen off old specimens. Often found in large numbers but very difficult to see find to their tiny size. Like all Torrendiella, this appear to be host-specific, being found on fallen, dead blackwood wattle (Acacia melanoxylon) leaves.
Similar SpeciesA similar looking species grows on Lilly Pilly leaves (see 9 Jun 2014 on Syzygium smithii) and there are other species in this genus that grow on the leaves of other plants. Some Torrendiella grow on twigs or bark, such as Torrendiella clelandii (found on dead Eucalyptus twigs) and Torrendiella madsenii (apparently only found on Nothofagus wood).
LinksLandcare Research NZ
Rating
Overall: 3/9
Color: 0/3
Shape: 2/3
Abundance: 1/3

Page Updated: 6-Jun-2016
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