Dragonflies: Austrothemis nigrescens

Damselflies Austroagrion cyane Austroagrion watsoni Austroargiolestes calcaris Austrocnemis splendida Austrolestes annulosus Austrolestes aridus Austrolestes cingulatus Austrolestes io Austrolestes leda Austrolestes psyche Coenagrion lyelli Hemiphlebia mirabilis Ischnura aurora Ischnura heterosticta Pseudagrion microcephalum Xanthagrion erythroneurum Dragonflies Anax papuensis Archaeosynthemis orientalis Austroaeschna ingrid Austroaeschna multipunctata Austroaeschna unicornis Austrogomphus guerini Austropetalia tonyana Austrothemis nigrescens Crocothemis nigrifrons Dendroaeschna conspersa Diplacodes bipunctata Diplacodes haematodes Diplacodes melanopsis Diplacodes trivialis Eusynthemis virgula Hemicordulia australiae Hemicordulia tau Notoaeschna sagittata Orthetrum caledonicum Parasynthemis regina Petalura gigantea Procordulia jacksoniensis Synthemis eustalacta Telephlebia brevicauda
distribution map
Source: ALA

male, Discovery Bay, VIC

female, Discovery Bay, VIC

teneral male, Discovery Bay, VIC
more
Common NameSwamp Flat-tail
FamilyLibellulidae
Genus/SpeciesAustrothemis nigrescens (Martin, 1901)
Abundance &
Distribution
Moderately common between Brisbane and Newcastle and around southern Western Australia, rare in South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria. In Victoria their only known regular breeding site is in Discovery Bay Coastal Park.
HabitatFound at lakes, swamps and permanent ponds, particularly with significant aquatic vegetation.
DescriptionMedium-sized dragonfly with distinctively broad abdomen, narrowing at the base for males. There are forward pointing black markings on the rear segments of the tail of the male. For females these black markings extent the entire length of the segments forming an almot continuous, jagged band on top of the tail.
Similar SpeciesAlthough significantly smaller, the head and thorax of female Nannophya look somewhat similar to this species.
Behaviour &
Observations
These dragonflies usually perch on the side of vertical vegetation, hanging at an angle of about 45°. They do not spend extensive periods in flight.

Page Updated: 23-Jan-2016
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