Damselflies: Austrolestes leda

Damselflies Austroagrion cyane Austroagrion watsoni Austroargiolestes calcaris Austrocnemis splendida Austrolestes annulosus Austrolestes aridus Austrolestes cingulatus Austrolestes io Austrolestes leda Austrolestes psyche Coenagrion lyelli Hemiphlebia mirabilis Ischnura aurora Ischnura heterosticta Pseudagrion microcephalum Xanthagrion erythroneurum Dragonflies Anax papuensis Archaeosynthemis orientalis Austroaeschna ingrid Austroaeschna multipunctata Austroaeschna unicornis Austrogomphus guerini Austropetalia tonyana Austrothemis nigrescens Crocothemis nigrifrons Dendroaeschna conspersa Diplacodes bipunctata Diplacodes haematodes Diplacodes melanopsis Diplacodes trivialis Eusynthemis virgula Hemicordulia australiae Hemicordulia tau Notoaeschna sagittata Orthetrum caledonicum Parasynthemis regina Petalura gigantea Procordulia jacksoniensis Synthemis eustalacta Telephlebia brevicauda
distribution map
Source: ALA

♂ Grampians, VIC

♀ Grampians, VIC

♂ unusual "spreadwing" posture
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Common Namewandering ringtail
FamilyLestidae (ringtails)
Genus/SpeciesAustrolestes leda (Selys, 1862)
Abundance &
Distribution
Common in Victoria and eastern NSW but occurs as far north as Cairns and also in through much of inland Australia.
HabitatCan be found at most still water and some slow sections of streams.
Description &
Identification
Mature males are mostly black but with significant blue markings. Immature males and females are less blue but the pale should (antehumeral) stripe is diagnostic, with its additional small mark below its end.
Similar SpeciesAustrolestes io is very similar and can only be separated from photographs by seeing details of the neck and abdominal segment 2. Other species in this genus may appear superficially similar but their patterns around the antehumeral stripe are different.
Behaviour &
Observations
Like others in the Austrolestes genus, this species usually perches with its wings closed above its body. However in December 2013 I observed a male holding his wings in the "spread-wing" fashion. This is known for some overseas lestids but is probably the first recording of this behaviour for and Austrolestes. I followed this damselfly around the swamp a little and his flight or other behaviour did not seem adversely affected (i.e. it was uninjured).
LinksBrisbane Insects
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Page Updated: 27-Oct-2016
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